Rabbit’s Southside

Asheville residents Claude Coleman, Jr., and Brett Spivey are hoping to re-establish the legacy of Rabbit’s Motel through music, food and art events.

A three-year revitalization project taking place inside Asheville’s historic Southside neighborhood has come to fruition with the opening of SoundSpace @ Rabbit’s, the city’s first public access music rehearsal facility.

The studio space, which will soon include a soul food eatery and mixed-medium artist amenities has taken residence inside the now-defunct Rabbit’s Motel, a Green Book site for African-American travelers that operated from the late 1940s until the turn of the 21st century.

Repurposing the building to accommodate the influx of creatives who call Asheville home, co-founders Claude Coleman, Jr., (of the rock outfit Ween) and Brett Spivey hope to carry the legacy of the historic construction by providing functional practice quarters and an accessible gathering place for artists of all mediums.

Established in 1948 by Fred “Rabbit” Simpson, Rabbit’s Motel was considered a crown jewel of Black-owned tourist courts in the segregation-era South. The inn provided lodging and dining for Black visitors, including such prominent figures as Chitlin Circuit entertainers, soul singer and performer Jackie Wilson, comedian Richard Pryor, race car driver Wendell Scott and baseball star Willie “Pops” Stargell.

At the heart of Rabbit’s Motel was Lou Ella Byrd’s beloved soul food kitchen, a town favorite dining establishment, which was famously known for its “pork chops the size of bibles.” Mrs. Byrd’s café operated for over half a century and was cherished by a cross-section of Asheville’s communities up to 2003.

In late 2021, local chef Clarence Robinson (also known as The Flavor King) will bring his culinary chops and signature “Cooking With Comedy” flair to the SoundSpace facility. A lifelong Asheville resident and relative of Rabbit Motel’s original owner, Robinson is set to recharge the vacated kitchen space with a new soul food café that will pay homage to the accomplishments of Mrs. Byrd, while informing a new vision for Western North Carolina’s rich food scene.

In addition to providing a vital service to Asheville’s rapidly expanding music sector, SoundSpace will soon boast a series of workshops, events and programs to foster the arts in underserved communities. Future plans include a livestream series called SoundSpace @ Rabbit’s Live, which will feature Afro-centric performances broadcast directly from inside the facility, and a multi-artist mural project that will reinvigorate the building’s exterior.

With equity and collaboration at the forefront, co-founders Coleman, Jr. and Spivey — both lifelong musicians and passionate community stakeholders — hope to establish SoundSpace as a longstanding resource that embraces a model of diversity through music, art, food, and collaboration.

For more information about SoundSpace, visit www.soundpaceavl.com.

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