K-Laser Pain Management Available in Biltmore Park

By Mary Koppenheffer

Biltmore Park Chiropractor, Dr. Michael Masterman, sees people in pain every day in his practice. This spring he added a new therapy for helping his patients. It’s called the K-Laser, a non-invasive tool for managing pain and promoting healing.

“After learning about and experiencing the Class IV K-Laser, I realized this treatment will be the way of the future for treating many chronic musculoskeletal conditions. In 20 years of practice, I have never seen results like this,” Masterman said. The K-Laser is a stand-alone treatment option as well as a supplement to other treatments offered in their Biltmore Park offices.

Laser therapy is the use of specific wavelengths of light to stimulate the body’s natural ability to heal. Lasers are classified by the amount of power, or light, they produce. The K-Laser is a class IV, the strongest available for this type of laser therapy. While earlier generation lasers achieved some level of success in pain management, Masterman noted two specific benefits with the class IV K-Laser. First, the increased power means he can apply a therapeutic dosage of laser light to a larger volume of tissue in the patient, and secondly, he can get more light deeper into the tissue. The result is reduction of pain and inflammation and promotion of healing injured soft and hard tissue.

Not to be confused with lasers used for surgery, hair removal, or other procedures that may involve cutting, the non-invasive K-Laser is a different type of device. It produces a photo chemical reaction by shining a light on the tissues of the body that need healing. A K-Laser treatment enhances circulation by getting more red blood cells flowing to the affected area while increasing oxygen to the tissues. The result is decreased inflammation and scar tissue formation.

Masterman said the treatments are painless and can reduce muscle spasm and stiffness which leads to immediate pain relief. The result is often quicker healing than the body would do on its own.

Masterman has found his patients have opted for the K-Laser treatments because they are an alternative to medications and surgery. “Most have found immediate relief, even after 1 treatment.” He has already seen the treatment work well on a broad range of conditions including arthritis, disc bulges and herniations, joint pain, tendinitis and bursitis, chronic headaches, myofascial trigger points, and neck and back pain.

He has also seen patients with pain and injury resulting from competitive sports, repetitive use, as well as the stress and strain of daily activities, including hours in front of computers. Treatments have been successful on both hard and soft tissues, including muscles, ligaments, and even bones.

Prior to using the K-Laser, a treatment plan is developed that is specific to the patient’s condition. A typical session ranges from 4 to 12 minutes and involves the practitioner passing a small wand of light over the affected area. Doctor and patient wear special glasses because of the strength of the laser’s light. The number of sessions depends on the injury being treated and generally requires 3 to 12 visits.

“It’s exciting to help a patient who has tried other options with little or no relief – from other treatments like corticosteroid injections, pharmaceuticals, physical therapy, or surgery.”

Laser treatments have been available outside of the United States for more than 30 years but only received FDA approval in 2004. Several published research studies support the efficacy of laser treatments for many different conditions.

K-Laser Pain Management of Asheville is located at 30 Town Square Blvd., Suite 204. It is one of two facilities offering K-Laser treatment in Western North Carolina. For more information, call their office at 828-676-1326, or visit their website at klaserpainrelief.com.

About Shelby Harrell

Shelby Harrell is the news editor of the Biltmore Beacon, editor of The Guide arts and entertainment publication and is a staff writer for Mountaineer Publishing. Originally from Asheville, she has worked in journalism for more than six years and currently lives in Clyde, NC.